Before You Apply #Versatility #GetAccepted (Post 3 of 5)


This month, I continue the theme of  graduate education and what to consider #Before You Apply.  This strategy consists of five concepts: Vision, Viability, Versatility, Vulnerability and Being Vested. Please go to the website to review the first two concepts and for more background.


Concept Review from last post: Viability

Consider: Is this program a viable option for ME?

Due diligence is selecting the right degree and the right program before you apply. The effort extended PRE-application will save you time and money once you are accepted. There is an ideal fit between your strengths and capabilities and degree program to which you apply for admission.


The issue of viability is also important because it ensures that your training will lead to the skills, networks, and industry access upon completion. Don’t let your insecurity about getting accepted cause you to miss identifying important information about the program. In graduate school, students represent the brand of the faculty. There are formal and informal gates requiring their seal of approval and support through each stage of the program. These may include: comprehensive exams, proposals, internship and/or a defense of the thesis or dissertation. That post also proposed over ten items to consider as criteria for evaluating programs.


Before You Apply: Ask are you ready to increase your versatility?

Versatility is the word of the day in surviving, thriving and leveraging your experience and expertise after graduation. While many people believe their current work and family life requires a lot of versatility, pursuing a master’s degree or doctorate requires significantly greater and deeper levels of this characteristic. One level of this is intellectual curiosity and flexibility. In my own theological training, social science and n clinical courses, it was useful to develop a loose attachment to important concepts, theories and approaches. New ideas (to the student) are constantly introduced, examined and turned inside out.

Students read assignment not to say that’s ‘done’ but to put it aside and often return with completely fresh eyes seeing its context or limitations after exposure to competing ideas. Critical thinking is like an overused pun when discussing course goals and objectives. Yet, my first degree practically ruined my ability to tightly hold on to specific concepts. My mind was especially skilled in playing the role of the critic. Even now, I can efficiently identify the faults and limitations of many proposed solutions; for this I give thanks to mentors and classmates who indulged in countless heated debates presenting complex contingencies for nearly any topic. Nevertheless, for those who love learning, these discussions lead to important socialization processes. In fact, many grad students agree that time spent in discussion over the world’s ‘Big Problems’ was both intimidating and inspiring offering the most favorable memories of the process.

Dr. Briallen Hopper (2019) writes about a universal secret love of grad school in the article, “Enjoying Grad School.” Besides intellectualism, grad school provides flexibility in professional connections and credentials due to the myriad of tasks required to succeed. These include communication, finding funding for education, work and study hours, negotiation with house/roommates, coordination with advisers, contributing as an assistant in research or teaching or both. Hopper also suggests some of these skills are also essential after grad schoolfacing continuous evaluation and rejection and learning to ask others for support.

In closing, here are some ways you can begin to develop or expand your skills in intellectual curiosity or versatility:

  • Identify the top 5 influencers in your future field and choose one to begin reading their most recent publication.

  • Identify the graduate student organizations on campus at you top school, and visit their websites.

  • For those same organizations, send an email to the graduate student leader and ask a few questions.

  • Read faculty profiles in the program.

  • Review the course list for the requirements for the degree.

  • Search for syllabi online for required courses.

  • Find out if there are opportunities for graduate students to work on research with faculty, post docs, etc.

This list contains a sample of the suggestions that I’ve made to current grad students who struggled with this skill. It is definitely not exhaustive.


Please like, comment and share this post if this post has been helpful. Next month’s post will discuss vulnerability. How much and when to share the ‘real’ you Before You Apply. Thanks for reading! See you next time.

Link to Chronicle of Higher Ed Article mentioned above:
https://www.chronicle.com/article/On-Enjoying-Grad-School/245486

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